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OpenReader

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Another important thrust of the OpenReader Consortium, in parallel with developing the OpenReader format, is to design and implement an open-source, high-quality, cross-platform reference implementation of an OpenReader reading system (“browser”). This is important so as to launch and establish the format standard, and to provide an open source code base upon which the digital publication industries can build upon. (As a historical example, when the HTML format was invented, the NCSA Mosaic browser was built to display HTML — without Mosaic (a “reference implementation”) the HTML format, and the World Wide Web, may never have gotten off the ground.)
Another important thrust of the OpenReader Consortium, in parallel with developing the OpenReader format, is to design and implement an open-source, high-quality, cross-platform reference implementation of an OpenReader reading system (“browser”). This is important so as to launch and establish the format standard, and to provide an open source code base upon which the digital publication industries can build upon. (As a historical example, when the HTML format was invented, the NCSA Mosaic browser was built to display HTML — without Mosaic (a “reference implementation”) the HTML format, and the World Wide Web, may never have gotten off the ground.)
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* [http://www.bestessays.com/book_report.php book reports]
 

Current revision as of 15:46, 13 July 2007

from the Open Reader Consortium Homepage:

OpenReader™ is a cooperative project to create a universal, open standards digital publication distribution format which will be platform-independent and capable of high typographic presentation quality. Supported publication types include books (“ebooks”), periodicals, newspapers, and business documents — most any kind of content best presented to the reader in a page-based manner.

Platform independence and open standards are very important goals of the OpenReader format design. This means that publications in the OpenReader format will be readable on a wide range of computing devices, such as desktop/laptop PCs (Windows, Linux and Mac), and portable handhelds (tablets/webpads, PDAs and PDA/cellphone combos, dedicated ebook readers, etc.)

Other equally important goals of the OpenReader format are universal acceptance and permanence. A key to achieving this, in addition to fully embracing open standards, is to properly address the important needs and requirements of authors, publishers and consumers. It also requires the format be of sufficiently high typographic quality and extensible, so as to follow the rapid improvements in technology — to not become obsolete.

Another important thrust of the OpenReader Consortium, in parallel with developing the OpenReader format, is to design and implement an open-source, high-quality, cross-platform reference implementation of an OpenReader reading system (“browser”). This is important so as to launch and establish the format standard, and to provide an open source code base upon which the digital publication industries can build upon. (As a historical example, when the HTML format was invented, the NCSA Mosaic browser was built to display HTML — without Mosaic (a “reference implementation”) the HTML format, and the World Wide Web, may never have gotten off the ground.)